Archive for the Controversy Category

10 Things Not to Share with Your Co-workers

Posted in Comedy, Controversy, Living, Work with tags , , on February 22, 2010 by Richard James Clark II

10 Things Not to Share with Your Co-workers


Article by Rachel Zupek and Stephanie Loleit, CareerBuilder.co.uk

Most of us spend more time at the workplace with colleagues than anywhere else (unfortunately!). So it just comes natural that we talk about many other things than simply work. In fact, this is even essential in order to build a good relationship with your co-workers. Maybe you go down the pub with them on Fridays and some of your colleagues you even count as real friends.

However, it is important to know where to draw the line. There are certain things co-workers need not know about each other, including religious and political views as well as personal issues, but some folks just can’t seem to keep their mouths shut.

Plus don’t forget — a casual conversation can easily turn into office gossip, which again can easily turn around to the one who spreads it — including yourself.

To avoid risking your professional image, here are 10 things to never share or discuss with your co-workers:

1. Salary information

What you earn is between you and Human Resources. Disclosure indicates you aren’t capable of keeping a confidence.

2. Medical history

Aches and pains, your latest operation, your infertility woes or the contents of your medicine cabinet, can be serious worries to you — and only you. To your employer, your constant medical issues make you seem like an expensive, high-risk employee.

3. Work complaints

Constant complaints about your workload, stress levels or the company will quickly make you the kind of person who never gets invited to lunch. If you don’t agree with company policies and procedures, address it through official channels or move on.

4. Cost of purchases

The spirit of keeping up with the Joneses is alive and well in the workplace, but you don’t want others speculating on the lifestyle you’re living — or if you’re living beyond your salary bracket.

5. Intimate details

Don’t share intimate details about your personal life. This is no one’s business other than yours and your partner’s. It also makes people uncomfortable. So keep your personal bedroom details private or people will snigger about you behind your back.

6. Politics or religion

Both faith and politics are very sensitive issues and people can be very passionate about them. You may alienate a co-worker or be viewed negatively in a way that could impact your career. Be discreet and don’t force your views on others.

7. Lifestyle changes and personal problems

Breakups, divorces and baby-making plans should be shared only if there is a need to know, and then maybe only to selected people in private. Otherwise, others will speak for your capabilities, desires and limitations on availability, whether there is any truth to their assumptions or not.

8. Blogs or social networking profile

Be careful about what you say in a social networking community or in your personal blog. This may be even more damaging than what you say in person as it could show a totally different side of you. Comments online can be seen by multiple eyes. An outburst of anger when you are having a bad day … can blow up in your face.

9. Hangovers and wild weekends

It’s perfectly fine to have fun during the weekend, but don’t talk about your wild adventures on Monday. That information can make you look unprofessional and unreliable.

10. Off-color or racially charged comments

You can assume your co-worker wouldn’t be offended or would think something is funny, but you never know. Don’t take that risk. Furthermore, even if you know for certain your colleague wouldn’t mind your comment, don’t talk about it at work. Others can easily overhear.

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The Occult Roots of The Wizard of Oz

Posted in Controversy, Education, Film, Folklore, Literature and Books, News Media, Religion, Theatre, TV, Urban Myths with tags , , , , , on February 1, 2010 by Richard James Clark II

This is a article from one my favourite websites, and i may put alot of the articles on here for the wordpress community.

The Occult Roots of The Wizard of Oz

Oct 8th, 2009 | By Vigilant | Category: Vigilant Reports

With its memorable story and its cast of colorful characters, the Wizard of Oz quickly became an American classic. More than a hundred years after the release of this book, kids everywhere are still enchanted by Oz’s world of wonder. Few, however, recognize that, under its deceptive simplicity, the story of the Wizard of Oz conceals deep esoteric truths inspired by Theosophy. Here we’ll look at the Wizard of Oz’s occult meaning and its author’s background.

The Occult Roots of The Wizard of Oz

With its memorable story and its cast of colorful characters, the Wizard of Oz quickly became an American classic. More than a hundred years after the release of this book, kids everywhere are still enchanted by Oz’s world of wonder. Few, however, recognize that, under its deceptive simplicity, the story of the Wizard of Oz conceals deep esoteric truths inspired by Theosophy. Here we’ll look at the Wizard of Oz’s occult meaning and its author’s background.

Although the Wizard of Oz is widely perceived as an innocent children’s fairy tale, it is almost impossible not to attribute a symbolic meaning to Dorothy’s quest. As in all great stories, the characters and the symbols of the Wizard of Oz can be given a second layer of interpretation, which may vary depending on the reader’s perception. Many analyses appeared throughout the years describing the story as an “atheist manifesto” while others saw it as a promotion of populism. It is through an understanding of the author’s philosophical bckground and beliefs, however, that the story’s true meaning can be grasped.

L. Frank Baum, the author of the Wizard of Oz was a member of the Theosophical Society, which is an organization based on occult research and the comparative study of religions. Baum had a deep understanding of Theosophy and, consciously or not, created an allegory of Theosophic teachings when he wrote the Wizard of Oz.

For the rest of the article check the link below….

http://vigilantcitizen.com/?p=2282

THE WORST 12 COVER SONGS IN MUSIC EVER

Posted in Comedy, Controversy, Dance, Music, Urban Myths with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2009 by Richard James Clark II

THE WORST 12 COVER SONGS

Alot of songs have been covered and original songwriters have made a lot of money. It was common in the 60s for at least one Bob Dylan or Burt Bacharach song to be on most albums and in the 70’s this occurred less frequent. In the last 20 years artists have sampled from famous tracks and created better songs or horrible re-harshes.

But below is in my opinion the worst top 1 covered songs, the reason for this is due to awful singing, no imaginative re-working, pales in comparison to the original or just plain and simply awful.

Number 12

Girls Wanna Have Fun-Miley Cyrus

Her father was an awful singer with Achy Breaking heart, but this just reminds you why Americans youth is so messed up after listening to this I just wanted to piece my eardrums with forks. Dreadful and this is the cover of Cyndi Lauper’s infamous song, so this song had now messed up two generations of American children, should be banned for future governments.

Number 11

Faith-Limp Bizkit

The group is named after a rugby boys changing room game, so that doesn’t help. Then you massacre a classic 80’s song by George Michael. At first listen back in the late 90’s this song was more comical now 10 years later you just wonder why did anyone like Fred Durst or this group.

copy link above into browser-Universal think it is so great that it can’t be embedded in this blog.

Number 10

American Pie-Madonna

Classic 70’s song about the story of Buddy Holly written by Don Mclean, Madonna simply covered this song for the dreadful film ‘The Next Best Thing’ in which Rupert Everest has to pretend to love Madonna (I think that is hard for a straight man to do I.E Guy Ritchie). Hence the song has no real meaning and the video is just vacuous, and the next song released after this ‘American Life’, someone really should just hand Madonna a giro book and she should retire as she is quite embarrassing.

Number 9

911 Is A Joke-Duran Duran

Duran Duran covers a Public Enemy song, WTF? Duran Duran at this time was trying to find themselves as a group after their 80’s heyday, and this redneck version is like a poor song in the background of My Name Is Earl. Listen to this and cringe in despair

Number 8

Rocket Man-William Shatner

Yes, William Shatner (Captain Kirk) sings an Elton John song. Now you know what a HAM actor Shatner is, well his singing is no better, but the joke is he has released at least four albums in his lifetime. This was performed at a science fiction award show and presented by Bernie Taupin (the original writer) who must have been pissing himself back stage.

Number 7

Wild Thing Oliver Reed & Alex Higgins

The Troggs version in the 60’s was always tongue in cheek, but this cover is bizarre (the video is even stranger) and actually released to compete for a Christmas number one during the early 90’s. Oliver Reed being sober at this time was RARE (check interviews with Oliver Reed) and Alex Higgins the same. So to come up with this, a record company thought this would be a great tax write off, because it is that dreadful.

Number 6

Billie/Thriller-Ian Brown

Ian Brown has legendary status in his field of alternative/indie but he released in the late 90’s a double A side of Billie Jean and Thriller. Now most people try not to cover Michael Jackson due to respect or not wanting to ruin original classic songs, so why did Ian Brown think he could do these songs justice. The word my friends is EGO, as again both of these versions are lifeless and soulless, something usually people don’t associate with Michael Jackson’s music. Find this on youtube to Listen and weep.

Number 5

The Tide Is High/Eternal Flame-Atomic Kitten

EMI had a problem with Atomic Kitten; they did ok for a pop group with their unmemorable songs but not making enough money so they were going to be dropped unless they had good songs that made some revenue as it was costing the record company a lot of wasted money. So some brainiac in the record company thought lets get them to sing a cover. Eternal Flame covered by Atomic Kitten became a Number One record after their first dreadful song Number One single Whole Again. Now their was a new problem, the group had to make more money to ride on the success, so they created a soulless version of the Tide is High The Blondie version is bearable for a pop song, a cover of an old reggae song-which never gets heard very much. The Atomic Kitten version is different and has a new bridge section, which if you hear, it was not needed. Xenomania produced this and other awful pop songs by Girls Aloud, The Saturdays and the list goes on, this teaches you that sometimes songs should be left alone.

copy link above, EMI are proud of this but won’t allow this to be embedded into blogs….

Number 4

Papa Don’t Preach-Kelly Osbourne

This whiny adolescent tramp wannabe thought she had so much talent after the success of reality TV show The Osbourne’s. Well bad news for Kelly,

• Your mum Sharon is a great business women
• Your Dad Ozzy is a talented musician and is part of rock royality
• Your brother has a personality which you lack

Kelly you are a famous nobody and quite frankly you should stay under a rock. This her first song released on her first album a cover of a Madonna classic and the joke is Kelly hates Madonna songs, but the music industry and world didn’t buy into Kelly’s music career for too long she got dropped after her second album, there is justice in the world.

Number 3

Dancing In The Street-David Bowie and Mick Jagger

A great Motown classic butchered by two actually Rock Legends who should have known better. The worst thing about this version it was a number one when the original failed to be. Plus they seem to have this need to teach primary children countries around the world, and both of them in the video look like they will break into a fight. Plus I am sure a mistake in the video when Bowie is singing at 1:34, Mick Jagger is drinking a can of coke, plus watch the syncing.

copy this link into your browser, and laugh at Bowie and Jaggers butchered version of this classic song.

Number 2

Like A Virgin-Lords Of The New Church

Well Madonna butchered American Pie and Kelly Osbourne destroyed Papa don’t Preach. However a group can destroy a Madonna classic in the most unusual way, so awful it makes you wonder the A&R scout didn’t get instantly sacked for this.

Number 1

Don’t Go Breaking My Heart feat Macy Gray/ButterCup-ODB

ODB is sadly not with us; he is no doubt one of the most original MC ‘s in Hip–Hop history. For some reason though and I don’t think he thought he could sing, but for some reasons ODB believed he should release songs. Don’t go breaking my hear was originally a hit for Kiki Dee and Elton John and then again for Rupaul and Elton John, and others have covered this song. So it is not like it has much creditability., but oh yes ODB has gone one further and actually made it comical and butchered the song. Plus to add insult to injury he has Macy Gray as the female lead. This is probably the weirdest duet in music history.

However ODB has not just covered one song in his short musical career, others in his repertoire is Cold Blooded by Rick James, and a weird version of The Foundations-Buttercup. Which we have the link here for you below also.

Don’t Go Breaking My Heart

Build Me Up ButterCup

Donny Hathaway-The Legend and The Legacy-Documentary

Posted in Controversy, Folklore, Music, Urban Myths with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 10, 2009 by Richard James Clark II

Donny Hathaway

The story of Donny Hathaway is a tragic loss to the world of soul music since 1979 when he died at the age of 35 years old, however his legacy is still influential.

Life

Donny Hathaway was born in Chicago in the post 2nd world war era and grew up in a housing project with his grandmother. Hathaway began singing gospel music in a church choir along with his grandmother (a professional gospel singer) at the age of 3.

Hathaway while growing up also played the ukulele and being fascinated by Liberace studied the piano as a child. While at high school Hathaway was known as a piano prodigy, which eventually earned him a fine-arts scholarship to Howard University in 1964. He attended Howard University for three years and performed with The Ric Powel Trio, a jazz trio. Hathaway left Howard University without a degree due to the huge amount of job offers in music in 1967.

Career

Hathaway career started as a songwriter, session musician and producer for a local label in his hometown Chicago called Twinight Records, he later did arrangements for many groups including The Unifics and participated in projects by The Staple Singers (a well known gospel group) Jerry Butler and Aretha Franklin, as well with Curtis Mayfield. After working with Curtis, Donny became a “house producer” for Mayfield’s label, Curtom Records, he started recording there as a member of The Mayfield Singers. He recorded his first single under his own name in 1969, a duet with singer June Conquest called “I Thank You Baby”.

From this success Hathaway signed a deal with Atco records and released the famous ‘The Ghetto Part 1’ this song was a highlight of the critically acclaimed 1970 album Everything is Everything, his second album the self titled Donny Hathaway album was also well received.

Hathaway’s main success song wise is the Christmas standard, “This Christmas.” The song, released in 1970, has become a holiday staple and is often used in movies, television and advertising. Numerous artists have covered “This Christmas” across diverse musical genres.

In 1972 Hathaway would have two commercial and critically acclaimed successful albums. The ‘Live’ album and then the famous duets album with another former Howard University musical prodigy ‘Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway’ which contained the huge hit Where Is The Love written by Ralph McDonald (who would later write Just The Two OF Us for Bill Withers). The album was mainly a covers album with Carole King’s ‘You’ve Got A Friend’ and showcased some of Hathaway’s own writing.

The effects of Hathaway’s melancholia also drove a wedge into Flack and Hathaway’s friendship; they did not reconcile for several years, and did not release additional music until the 1978 release of “The Closer I Get To You”. The single became a popular and R&B hit, and Flack and Hathaway resumed studio recording to compose a second album of duets thereafter, which he never finished, though these songs were released on a Roberta Flack album in 1979.

Up until his death Donny would work on numerous projects but suffered from severe bouts of depression. It was found that he was suffering from E and was known to have taken up to 14 pills two to three times per day to control this disease. This condition wreaked havoc on his life (his marriage separated) and required several hospitalisations.

Legacy

Hathaway legacy has been influential to a many artists, the LIVE album especially for new R&B Singer/Songwriters such as Brian Mc Knight, Alicia Keys, India Arie and Frank McComb, within his own family Hathaway’s daughter Lalah Hathaway has enjoyed a successful solo career. While his other daughter Kenya is one of the three backing vocalists on the hit TV program American Idol.

American Idol has also helped Hathaway back catalog be recognized again by the talent of Ruben Studdard and in the 2006 the runner-up Elliott Yamin cited him as an influence and wanted the spotlight back on Hathaway due to this sales of A Donny Hathaway Collection shot all the way up to twenty-third on the Amazon.com CD sales chart, with some commentators citing the performance as their reason for buying Hathaway’s CD

Below is a Five Part Documentary.

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Video 5

Michael Jackson Legacy and Life at Sony.

Posted in Controversy, Dance, Folklore, Music, News Media, Nights Out, Urban Myths with tags , , , , , on October 11, 2009 by Richard James Clark II

With Michael Jackson’s passing in June

Their has been a lot of speculation on what he was like in reality and how he worked in the music industry.

Well this 6 part radio interview with two staff members at Sony music gives you an insight in what Michael was like as a human being and a recording artist.

The people being interviewed is Cory Rooney and Chris Apostle

Cory Rooney has worked and been instrumental in the music careers Jennifer Lopez, Destiny’s Child, Shakira to name a few.

While Michael was working on Invincible Cory was his confident and inside man at Sony. He discusses this within the interviews and what Michael was like to work in the studio with.

Chris Apostle is a music executive at Sony Music and dealt with a lot of business issues at Sony related to Michael.

The interviews are in 10 min chunks

Enjoy

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

Michael Jackson Videos YOU MAY HAVE NEVER SEEN

Posted in Controversy, Dance, Film, Memorabilia, Music, Urban Myths with tags , , , , , , , , on September 13, 2009 by Richard James Clark II

Okay

If you were or still are a Michael Jackson fan

Here is some video treats for you

Captain EO

Part 1

Part 2

Captain EO

Captain EO is a 3-D film starring Michael Jackson and directed by Francis Ford Coppola that was shown at Disney theme parks in the 1980s and 1990s.

This is a story description below

The movie tells the story of Captain EO and the ragtag crew of his spaceship on a mission to deliver a gift to a wicked alien leader, the Witch Queen, on her home world of rotting, twisted metal and steaming vents. Captain EO’s alien crew consists of his small flying sidekick Fuzzball, the double-headed navigator and pilot Idee and Odee, robotic security officer Major Domo, a small robot Minor Domo (who fits like a module into Major Domo), and the clumsy elephant-like shipmate Hooter (Tony Cox) who always manages to blunder the crew’s missions.

Upon arriving on the planet, the crew is captured and sentenced to torture. Before being sent away, EO tells the Witch Queen that he sees the beauty hidden within her, and that he brings her the key to unlock it: his song, “We Are Here To Change The World”.

The two robot members of the crew transform into music instruments and the crew members begin to play the various instruments. As Hooter runs toward his instrument, he trips over EO’s cape and breaks his instrument, stopping the music. The spell broken, the Witch Queen orders her guards to capture Captain EO and his crew.

Hooter manages to repair his instrument and sends out a blast of music, providing EO with the power to throw off the guards. He uses his power to transform the dark hulking guards into agile dancers who fall into step behind him for a dance number. As EO presses forward toward the Supreme Leader she unleashes her Nich Warriors, two cybernetic defenders each with a whip and shield that can deflect EO’s power.

The others all run away leaving Captain EO to fight the Nich Warriors alone. EO is trapped by a closing gate and is preparing for a last stand as both the whip warriors draw their whips back for a final blow. Fuzzball drops his instrument and speedily flies over to tie the two whips together, causing the Nich Warriors to be thrown off balance giving EO an opportunity to transform them as well. With no further obstacles, EO uses his power to transform the Witch Queen into a beautiful woman, her lair into a peaceful Greek temple and the planet into a verdant paradise.

A celebration breaks out to “Another Part of Me”, as EO and his crew triumphantly exit and fly off into space.

Special FX used when watching this at Disney World

Captain EO made full use of its 3-D effects. The action on the screen extended into the audience, including lasers, laser impacts, smoke effects, and starfields that filled the theater. These effects resulted in the seventeen-minute film costing an estimated $30 million to produce.[1] At the time it was the most expensive film ever produced on a per-minute basis, averaging out at $1.76 million per minute.

Music

Two new songs appeared in the film. The first, is an early version of “Another Part of Me.” The song was re-mixed and later appeared on Jackson’s hugely successful Bad album. It was released as a single in 1988.

The song also makes a brief appearance in the movie “Rush Hour” in which Chris Tucker mimics Captain EO after blowing up a car.

“We Are Here to Change the World” was not officially released until 2004 as part of Michael Jackson: The Ultimate Collection. This version however, is not the same version heard in the film. Soul/R&B singer Deniece Williams covered the song on her As Good As It Gets album (1988).

THE MAKING OF MOONWALKER

This was originally a BBC special and it contains 2 parts.

Part 1

Part 2

Making on In The Closet

Famous video with Naomi Campbell and the great late Herb Ritts

Banned Cartoons! How Times Change?

Posted in Cartoons, Controversy, Folklore, Literature and Books, Racism, Sex, TV, Urban Myths with tags , , , , , , , on June 18, 2009 by Richard James Clark II

It always interests me that cartoons are a medium that can get away with alot besides their for kids only RIGHT?.

They don’t express personnal beliefs RIGHT?

Well we all got confused when Bugs Bunny wore a dress, and Donald Duck you walks around with no trouser but leave the shower with a towel around his bottom half. RIGHT?

Well these clips are a few examples of banned cartoons for numerous reasons.

The first one is Tiny Toons which shows the effect of Alcohol-Shame this was banned, would be a good deterent..

The others are banned due to drug use or racist stereotypes, and to think that back then these cartoons were considered ok

So if you do take offense to any of these just a reminder they are not allowed on television AT ALL NOW

Most of the cartoon makers were German and had links with Nazi parties.

However in the future check out Disney films and the secrets behind them, check it out on the web, it is quite shocking…