Archive for February, 2010

10 Things Not to Share with Your Co-workers

Posted in Comedy, Controversy, Living, Work with tags , , on February 22, 2010 by Richard James Clark II

10 Things Not to Share with Your Co-workers


Article by Rachel Zupek and Stephanie Loleit, CareerBuilder.co.uk

Most of us spend more time at the workplace with colleagues than anywhere else (unfortunately!). So it just comes natural that we talk about many other things than simply work. In fact, this is even essential in order to build a good relationship with your co-workers. Maybe you go down the pub with them on Fridays and some of your colleagues you even count as real friends.

However, it is important to know where to draw the line. There are certain things co-workers need not know about each other, including religious and political views as well as personal issues, but some folks just can’t seem to keep their mouths shut.

Plus don’t forget — a casual conversation can easily turn into office gossip, which again can easily turn around to the one who spreads it — including yourself.

To avoid risking your professional image, here are 10 things to never share or discuss with your co-workers:

1. Salary information

What you earn is between you and Human Resources. Disclosure indicates you aren’t capable of keeping a confidence.

2. Medical history

Aches and pains, your latest operation, your infertility woes or the contents of your medicine cabinet, can be serious worries to you — and only you. To your employer, your constant medical issues make you seem like an expensive, high-risk employee.

3. Work complaints

Constant complaints about your workload, stress levels or the company will quickly make you the kind of person who never gets invited to lunch. If you don’t agree with company policies and procedures, address it through official channels or move on.

4. Cost of purchases

The spirit of keeping up with the Joneses is alive and well in the workplace, but you don’t want others speculating on the lifestyle you’re living — or if you’re living beyond your salary bracket.

5. Intimate details

Don’t share intimate details about your personal life. This is no one’s business other than yours and your partner’s. It also makes people uncomfortable. So keep your personal bedroom details private or people will snigger about you behind your back.

6. Politics or religion

Both faith and politics are very sensitive issues and people can be very passionate about them. You may alienate a co-worker or be viewed negatively in a way that could impact your career. Be discreet and don’t force your views on others.

7. Lifestyle changes and personal problems

Breakups, divorces and baby-making plans should be shared only if there is a need to know, and then maybe only to selected people in private. Otherwise, others will speak for your capabilities, desires and limitations on availability, whether there is any truth to their assumptions or not.

8. Blogs or social networking profile

Be careful about what you say in a social networking community or in your personal blog. This may be even more damaging than what you say in person as it could show a totally different side of you. Comments online can be seen by multiple eyes. An outburst of anger when you are having a bad day … can blow up in your face.

9. Hangovers and wild weekends

It’s perfectly fine to have fun during the weekend, but don’t talk about your wild adventures on Monday. That information can make you look unprofessional and unreliable.

10. Off-color or racially charged comments

You can assume your co-worker wouldn’t be offended or would think something is funny, but you never know. Don’t take that risk. Furthermore, even if you know for certain your colleague wouldn’t mind your comment, don’t talk about it at work. Others can easily overhear.

The Occult Roots of The Wizard of Oz

Posted in Controversy, Education, Film, Folklore, Literature and Books, News Media, Religion, Theatre, TV, Urban Myths with tags , , , , , on February 1, 2010 by Richard James Clark II

This is a article from one my favourite websites, and i may put alot of the articles on here for the wordpress community.

The Occult Roots of The Wizard of Oz

Oct 8th, 2009 | By Vigilant | Category: Vigilant Reports

With its memorable story and its cast of colorful characters, the Wizard of Oz quickly became an American classic. More than a hundred years after the release of this book, kids everywhere are still enchanted by Oz’s world of wonder. Few, however, recognize that, under its deceptive simplicity, the story of the Wizard of Oz conceals deep esoteric truths inspired by Theosophy. Here we’ll look at the Wizard of Oz’s occult meaning and its author’s background.

The Occult Roots of The Wizard of Oz

With its memorable story and its cast of colorful characters, the Wizard of Oz quickly became an American classic. More than a hundred years after the release of this book, kids everywhere are still enchanted by Oz’s world of wonder. Few, however, recognize that, under its deceptive simplicity, the story of the Wizard of Oz conceals deep esoteric truths inspired by Theosophy. Here we’ll look at the Wizard of Oz’s occult meaning and its author’s background.

Although the Wizard of Oz is widely perceived as an innocent children’s fairy tale, it is almost impossible not to attribute a symbolic meaning to Dorothy’s quest. As in all great stories, the characters and the symbols of the Wizard of Oz can be given a second layer of interpretation, which may vary depending on the reader’s perception. Many analyses appeared throughout the years describing the story as an “atheist manifesto” while others saw it as a promotion of populism. It is through an understanding of the author’s philosophical bckground and beliefs, however, that the story’s true meaning can be grasped.

L. Frank Baum, the author of the Wizard of Oz was a member of the Theosophical Society, which is an organization based on occult research and the comparative study of religions. Baum had a deep understanding of Theosophy and, consciously or not, created an allegory of Theosophic teachings when he wrote the Wizard of Oz.

For the rest of the article check the link below….

http://vigilantcitizen.com/?p=2282